FAQs • Alternative transportation

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What is a Rumble Strip?

Rumble strips are a road safety feature that alerts inattentive drivers to potential danger by causing a tactile vibrations and audible rumbling, transmitted through the wheels into the car body. A rumble strip is usually either applied in the direction of travel along an edge- or centerline, to alert drivers when they drift from their lane, or in a series across the direction of travel, to warn drivers of a stop ahead or nearby danger spot. In favorable circumstances, rumble strips are effective (and cost-effective) at reducing accidents due to inattention. The effectiveness of shoulder rumble strips is largely dependent on a wide, stable shoulder for a recovery, but there are several other less obvious factors.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Public Safety, Traffic

Answers to August 16th Public Meeting regarding the Barricade at Harrow and Academy.

On August 16th, 2012, I met with a number of residents to discuss the purpose, side-effects, and any suggestions to the Harrow barricade at Academy Road.

I was asked a number of questions, which I have provided answers to below:

Why does Harrow have a barricade?
 
The barricade was placed as part of the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation network (insert link) and includes a traffic light, to make the Harrow/ Academy intersection safer for bicycle and pedestrian crossing, while not allowing for an increase in vehicle traffic to and from Wellington.
 
The traffic light was placed to allow safer crossing along Harrow at Academy Road. It connects the Harrow Active Transportation Corridor from Wellington Crescent to Pembina Hwy, and crosses the other Active Transportation Corridors at Grosvenor and Warsaw.
 
Providing a four-way light at Harrow would have provided access via Harrow St. to and from Wellington Crs.
 
The results would be making
-          Increase vehicle traffic along Harrow and Wellington Crs as a  through route for people going and coming from downtown.
-          Harrow from Academy to Wellington Crs would be a lineup of cars waiting to cross Academy Rd in the morning, and a lineup of cars along Kelvin High School to cross over Academy to Wellington Crs going home.
-          Increasing the amount of cars speeding along Wellington Crs
-          Provide a less safe crossing point for cyclist and pedestrians to cross Academy Rd. to the Wellington Crs paths.
 
Before the barricade vehicle cut-through traffic originating at the Maryland Bridge would travel through Wellington and on to Harrow, as an alternative to Academy and Stafford which has more traffic lights.
 
Additional vehicle cut-through traffic originating from the east would travel through Wellington and on to Harrow, as an alternative to Academy to Stafford, which has more traffic lights.
 
Traffic counts along Harrow Street before the barricade were at 350 vehicles per day to the north of Academy, and 5500 vehicles per day to the south of Academy. The four-way light would have dramatically increased the traffic along Harrow, a non-regional street, to the north and south of Academy.
 
The barricade provides the safe crossing for bicyclists and pedestrians, while not increasing this vehicle traffic.
 
Did Council vote to have the barricade put up?
 
There was no council vote for the Harrow barricade. The barricade was a part of the 2009 Active Transportation Stimulus plan, which was a plan to design and construct a network of active transportation paths where they are most needed across the City of Winnipeg. 
 
The City contributed one third of the cost, with the province and federal government paying the other two thirds.
 
The plan to fund an Active Transportation Stimulus Plan was adopted by Council on December 15th, 2009 as part of the 2010 Capital Budget. The infrastructure changes along the proposed routes were managed by the Public Works department with public input into the designs.
 
Were public consultations held before the Harrow barricade was constructed?
 
The coordinating consultant for the 2009 Active Transportation Stimulus Plan held public consultation events for input and feedback on the proposed changes for the Harrow, Grosvenor, Fleet, and Warsaw. The details are below:
 
January 30, 2010 - Earl Grey Community Centre
 
·         Promoted through Free Press and community newspaper ads
·         Colour posters along the routes and nearby commercial corridors
·         Listed on the Winnipeg Active Transportation website
 
February 24, 2010 - Earl Grey Community Centre
 
·         Promoted through the Free Press
·         Colour posters along the routes and nearby commercial corridors
·         Letters hand-delivered to all households and businesses directly adjacent to the proposed routes
·         Letter and package hand delivered to all local schools
·         Emails to residents from first consultations
·         Mall promotions
 
April 12, 2010 – Kelvin High School
 
§ Local Residents received invitations from the City of Winnipeg to an information session regarding the Barricade.
 
Were the Public Consultations Adequate?
 
I believe the public consultations fell short of what was required. As such, I took initiative in sending out post cards to all residents north of the CPR tracks in February 2010, notifying residents of the proposed changes, inviting them to attend the public consultations, and inviting any feedback or suggestions they may have. Additionally I sent out emails to as many residents and community leaders I could reach, provided neighbourhood updates on my website, and encouraged residents to sign up to my email updates on the issue.
 
Why was Harrow chosen as a bike path route?
 
The city conducted a bicycle route study in 2009, which showed that both Harrow and Stafford combined were one of the highest used bicycle routes in the city. The counts were consistent with the counts of the local bicycle lobbyist organization, Bike to the Future. Harrow was chosen as an Active Transportation Corridor because it’s a safer alternative to Stafford. Also, fewer bikes on Stafford would improve traffic flow along Stafford.
 
Have more bicyclists been using Harrow?
 
The city doesn’t have current bike counts for cyclists using Harrow to/from Wellington, although Bike to the Future counted bicyclists traveling along Harrow crossing Grosvenor. During the 2011-2012 counts, there was an increase of 136% in bicycles using Harrow at Grosvenor.
 
Were alternatives to the barricade considered?
 
The other choices reviewed by the department included crossing lights and pedestrians corridors but were considered as unsafe alternatives.
I met with a number of local residents in late 2010 to discuss suggestions regarding the Harrow barricade. Residents came up with an alternative design allowing westbound Academy traffic to access northbound Harrow, and allowing southbound traffic along Harrow to turn right onto westbound Academy. This option was designed to not allow for northbound Harrow traffic to cross the Academy intersection. The department reviewed the request and denied it in January 2011. The department stated these turns “would be contrary to the intent of having refuge areas for cyclists as they proceed across Academy Road. Allowing the turn movements would place the cyclists in conflict with turning vehicles.” In other words, the vehicles would need to drive over top of the bike lanes in order to make these turns.
 
I met again with local residents on September 16, 2012 and another alternative was presented by some community members which allowed traffic to go west bound onto Academy from Harrow. This alternative was denied by department for the same reasons as stated above.
 
What is the impact of the barricade on local residents?
 
Since the barricade has been put up, some local residents have expressed concerns about increased traffic in the lane between Guelph and Harrow, increased traffic along Guelph Street north of Harrow, exiting onto Academy from Guelph, accessing their properties and difficulty with parking along Harrow. :
 
What has been done about the increase in back lane traffic between Harrow and Guelph?
 
Once the barricade came in, a number of drivers began using the lane adjacent to Academy connecting Harrow and Guelph to go onto Harrow and then onto Wellington Crescent. Drivers also turned from Wellington onto Harrow, and down the lane to Guelph. While traffic counts were relatively high at first, a number of things were done to decrease the traffic volume.
 
·         In June of 2011 and 2012 my office notified the local churches at the corner of Wellington and Academy of upcoming Sunday road closures and appropriate traffic routes for parishioners to use during Sunday closures.
·         In June 2011, my office asked the city’s traffic control unit to ensure that clear passage is made along Wellington to allow vehicles to travel along northbound Guelph to eastbound Wellington Crescent. I ensured this passage has continuously been maintained.
·         I requested that on Sundays ‘Local Access Only’ signs be installed along east and westbound Wellington for summer and fall 2011, and again 2012.
·         I arranged for an additional “Local Access Only” signs to be placed at the intersection of Wellington Crs and Academy, facing incoming traffic, to remind them of the closure and divert them away from Wellington Crs. and towards Academy before they arrived at Harrow and Wellington Crs. and the Sunday road closure signs.
·         I requested a traffic volume and speed study, which measured two full weeks of traffic between Sept 17 and Sept 30, 2011 along the back lane. The average daily counts were 113 vehicles per weekday, and 125 vehicles per weekend day. The city concluded this is below the expected normal volume of 9.8 vehicle trips per day per household (totaling 130 trips along Harrow per day). The majority of vehicles were below the 30 km per hour speed limit with the average speed being 21 km per hour and the 85th percentile being 29 km per hour.
·         Speed humps were not installed along this lane because the speed study showed the percentage of speeders was too low to meet the city warrant criteria for speed humps.
 
Can anything be done about the increase in traffic on Guelph?
 
I have asked the department to do a traffic study and provide options to address this traffic.
 
Has anything been done about the parking on Harrow north of Academy?
 
Because the lack of motor vehicle traffic now makes this section of Harrow safer for cyclists, I requested that the parking be re-instated along Harrow, despite the bike lanes. The department re-instated parking along the west side of Harrow in December 2010. In July 2011, the department decided not to allow parking because it would encourage further traffic to use the lane between Harrow and Guelph. I also requested that this portion of Harrow be no longer designated as a no-parking snow route during the winter months. The criteria was reviewed and a decision will be made by the department shortly.
 
Is the barricade safe?
 
The barricade, with the traffic lights, allows pedestrians and cyclists to easily cross Academy with reduced conflict with motor vehicles. This intersection had dangerous crossing beforehand. While Sunday traffic has increased along the lane, I ensured a dead-end sign was installed in 2011, and have worked with the local churches to ensure visitors have received information about alternative routes. I will continue to work with residents to ensure side effects do not pose a safety hazard.
 
Can the crossing time at the Harrow light be increased?
 
The current light crossing time is approximately five seconds of green light time. The department chose this timing because they do not want to promote traffic on Harrow as an alternative to Stafford. The department noted this is sufficient time for several vehicles to get through and for most people to get across. Longer time would encourage more drivers to use Harrow as an alternative to Stafford.
 
I discussed the crossing time at this light with the department in July 2011, five months after the installation of the traffic counts. At that time 311 had not yet received a request for an increase in crossing time at this intersection. The department advises that this light provides more than sufficient crossing time at the average walking speed. Should you have any reason to request an increased in crossing time, I will be happy to ask the department to review it.
 
Can a park with trees be placed on Harrow instead of a barricade?
 
Possibly. This would likely further reduce the potential of vehicles making illegal turns, and replace the barricade with a beautified landscape. However, at this point, local residents continue to bring suggestions for changes or removal of the barricade. A park should only be considered if there is plenty of agreement amongst the community that this should be done.
 
Can the Harrow traffic light be put on Wellington Crs instead?
 
No. Wellington Crescent at Harrow is an intersection of two residential streets within a residential neighbourhood. The more logical location is the intersection of Harrow and Academy. Wellington Crescent is widely used as a leisure route, open to pedestrians and cyclists during Sunday closures. A traffic light would have a significant negative impact to the beauty of this street.
 
Could a photo radar camera enforce traffic movements, reducing the need for a barricade?
 
A photo radar camera can only monitor traffic – it cannot enforce it.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Roads, Traffic

How do Cyclist Travel Through Traffic Circles?

Cyclists must travel through the traffic circle in a counter-clockwise direction, entering and exiting the circle on the right.

A cyclist or motorist already in the circle has the right of way. If a cyclist and motorist arrive at the same time, the vehicle to the right has the right of way (similar to a four way stop).

How to cycle through a traffic circle

  1. Safely merge from the bike lane into the traffic lane before entering traffic circle.
  2. Watch for pedestrians. Be prepared to stop in advance of the sidewalk if pedestrians are crossing.
  3. Yield to circulating traffic already in the intersection, on your left.
  4. If arriving at the intersection at the same time, yield to vehicles and cyclist  on the right, allowing them to enter the intersection first.
  5. When clear, enter and keep to the right of the center island and travel around the traffic circle in a counter-clockwise direction.
  6. Upon reaching your exit street, signal a right turn. Watch for pedestrians as you exit.
  7. Return to the bike lane.

How to drive a traffic circle

Since these traffic circles are a single lane in width, cyclist need to adjust their position closer to the center of the lane before the traffic circle and holding that position as you travel through.

Once you exit, return immediately to the most practicable position on the road.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Traffic

How to drive a Traffic Circle

  1. Slow your speed as you approach the intersection.
  2. Stop in advance of the sidewalk if pedestrians are crossing.
  3. Yield to vehicles that arrive first at the intersection.
    Yield to vehicles on the right if arriving at the same time.
  4. Keep to the right and travel around the traffic circle in a counterclockwise direction.

 


How to drive a Traffic Circle 

Categories: Alternative transportation, By-laws, Infrastructure, Roads, Traffic

Why is there no free transit service to Jets games as there are for Bomber games?

Bomber Fane Fare service is subsidised by the Winnipeg Blue Bomber Football Club, which is why this service can be offered. Unfortunately, with the number of games involved in the hockey season it does not look like we can form the same sort of partnership with the Jets Hockey Team.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Transit

City Administration Responses to Traffic Circle Suggestions

On December 12, 2010, Councillor Orlikow met with residents concerned about the safety associated with traffic circles.  There were a number of suggestions recommended and the following is a reply from the City of Winnipeg’s Transportation Department's response to those recommendations.

Q - Add speed humps to slow traffic as cars enter the intersection but only ¾ the length of the road to allow for cyclist to travel at either side.
 
A - As per the City’s criteria for installation of speed humps (approved by the Standing Policy Committee on Public Works on January 13, 2003 and approved by City council on January 29, 2003), speed humps are not permitted to be constructed on a transit route, snow route or a residential collector streets. Grosvenor Avenue is a transit route, snow route and a residential collector street, thus does not qualify for speed humps. 
 
Additional information:
 
-          Speed humps are most effective when spaced at 100-125 metre intervals along a route to effectively reduce vehicular speeds along a route. It is not the City’s practice to construct one speed hump to reduce vehicular speed at a certain point.  
 
-          Providing an open area to allow cyclists to travel beside the speed hump as suggested may encourage motorists to swerve such that one wheel can bypass the speed hump to reduce the impact of the vertical deflection.   This commonly occurs in parking lots.  This creates safety concerns for motorists, especially when traveling at or near the speed limit, as well as for cyclists which may be traveling within the adjacent open area. 
                                                                                             
Q - Add Pedestrian-crossing corridors and signage to assure that pedestrians have the right of way.
 
A - All of the City’s traffic circles are signed as according to the “Canadian Guide to Neighbourhood Traffic Calming” developed by the Transportation Association of Canada and Institute of Transportation Engineers.  The manual includes installation of a “yield” sign when entering the traffic circle on each approach.  The “yield” sign indicates to motorists that they must yield (and stop when necessary) the right-of-way to those that are in front of them (i.e., other motorists, pedestrians wishing to cross the street and cyclists), before entering the traffic circle, and must not proceed until it is safe to do so. 
 
Additional information:
 
            A yield sign requires that drivers must yield the right-of-way to all motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians that arrive first to the intersection.  As well, the City would not add a pedestrian crossing sign to a yield sign as it is not a proper traffic engineering practice to have two forms of traffic control devices at the same location.  It should also be noted that there is a hazard marker below the yield sign on the approach to the traffic calming circle, which would be obstructed by a crosswalk sign.  For the reasons stated above, the City is unable to recommend installation of pedestrian crossing signs at traffic calming circles. 
 
Please note that the City is currently working with Manitoba Public Insurance to enhance their education campaign to remind the public about what they are expected to know as drivers/cyclists/pedestrians when approaching and traveling within a traffic calming circle.  Please also note that MPI already published earlier this month ads in the Free Press information about traffic calming circles and other driving concepts required when driving through a traffic calming circle.  Below are links to both MPI and the City’s website containing this information:
 
 
 
Q - Remove bump-outs due to the danger associated with merging of bikes and cars.
 
The bump-outs are designed to reduce vehicular speeds of motorists when entering the traffic calming circle.  The bump-outs also help reduce the distance a pedestrian needs to walk on the street (hence reducing the collision potential) and increases the visibility of pedestrians.  Removing the bump-outs may increase vehicular speeds which may decrease safety of both cyclists and pedestrians.  
                                                                                                                                                                                          
Additional Information:
 
A continuous bike lane, that was suggested, through the intersection goes against proper traffic engineering practices as it would force drivers to drive over the bike lane in order to negotiate the traffic circle 
 
Please note that under the Manitoba Highway Traffic Act, motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians have a responsibility to conduct themselves appropriately when approaching each other.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Traffic

Why Traffic Circles?

Based upon Canadian engineering publications and sound engineering judgment we feel that the traffic calming circles are appropriate along this corridor. 

Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%. 
 
 
 
 
They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops. 
 
 
 
When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%.  They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years. 
 
Their purpose along this bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic.  The traffic calming circles will be signed and marked appropriately so they are not dangerous to the travelling public

Categories: Alternative transportation

Answers to Questions from Councillor John Orlikow

Q- Concern about removal of parking around the church on Grosvenor at Lanark

A - The parking lane along the north side of Grosvenor is under-utilized the majority of the time.  In order to provide for a safe bicycle corridor this space is required; it is recommended that parking be shifted to Beaverbrook and Lanark.   Alternatives for this current proposal are as follows:

a)     End bike corridor at Lanark and revert to a shared roadway for cyclist traffic was not approved by administration.
 
b)     Look at constructing bump-ins to accommodate Church patrons and park users.  However, this would be a drastic measure as mature trees would have to be removed and property would have to be acquired.  As well, with the construction of bump-ins for parking, the sidewalk would have to be reconstructed further north which was not approved by adminstration or the Councillor.
 

Q - Where the bike path goes once it dead ends at Lockwood

A - The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard ends at Lockwood after crossing the former CN rail right-of-way by a 3.5 metre multi-use pathway. Via Lockwood, cyclists can cross Kenaston at the traffic signals at either Tuxedo or Lockston. Tuxedo currently has a cyclist activated button to give cyclists a priority green light ahead of the traffic on Tuxedo on the west of Kenaston. As part of the Route 90 widening project a bike path has been proposed for two-way cyclist travel on the west boulevard of Kenaston. The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard via Tuxedo and Lockston would connect to this future bike path. In addition Tuxedo to the west of Kenaston is currently on the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation (AT) Network map as a future AT route that would connect to Grosvenor.

 
Q - For Fleet, Warsaw, Nassau to be a good
route, say from CMU, it needs to have a foot
path across the Rail Road track.  It has slow
RR traffic.
 
A - Unfortunately a footpath crossing of the
CPR rail lines between Renfrew and
Lindsay, while a good idea was not possible
for many reasons. These reasons include
budget, property issues and project
timelines. We have recognized that that the
east-west connections across the rail lines
are important and have proposed multi-use
pathways along the rail right-of-way on
Lindsay St to Corydon Ave and on Corydon
Ave across the tracks to Renfrew. By using
these pathways cyclists and pedestrians will
be able to connect from Fleet to John
Brebeuf Pl.
 
Q - Some streets in R. Heights could have
parking on the opposite side, i.e. some on E,
some on W.  This allows bikers to choose
streets where they are not likely to run into an
opening car door.
 
A - Due to the funding arrangement and
timing deadlines we are not able to conduct
a wider parking study on all streets within
River Heights.
 
Q - Cycling N & S. in our area could be
facilitated along the former RR track if narrow
cross walks were built on the boulevards of
Grant and Corydon.  We like to go this route
to Wellington and Assiniboine Park and is
now even more feasible with nice black top
along the new condos.
 
A-  Unfortunately due to property ownership
issues these routes cannot be pursued at
this time.
 
Q - My only concern is that the area to the
south-east of Pembina is cut off from this
route. I don't know if there are plans to put in
a pedestrian bridge or tunnel to go across.
 
A- The city is currently looking at solutions to
the Pembina underpass issue. While it is not
a part of this project, it is something that the
city will be looking at in the future.
 
Q - Going through our neighbourhood, I
much prefer Dorchester to Grosvenor; Lilac
to Stafford or Harrow. Removal of some of
the east-west stop signs would make
Dorchester much more useable
 
A -  As there are limited amounts of funding
and the corridors have already been chosen,
removal of stop signs and required
mitigation through traffic calming along
Dorchester is not within the scope of works
for the current project.
 
Q - Grosvenor Avenue between Stafford and
Wellington can be quite congested. Traffic
lines up for the light; there is continuous
parking; the street is not that wide. We
always avoid Grosvenor, taking the alley or
Dorchester. I cannot see adding bicycle
lanes without eliminating parking, which
would be a nuisance as the neighbourhood
is quite densely populated.
 
Currently there are no bicycle lanes
proposed on Grosvenor between Stafford
and Wellington for the reasons that you
mentioned and we agree that removing
parking on that particular stretch is not a
feasible option. 
 
Q-  I would very much like to see standard
signage alerting motorists that bicycles will
be crossing or entering a major street
 
A - This is something that we can consider
as part of our signage strategy for the
project. 
 
Q - We need to make sure that there are no
gaps. One of these is the connection
between the Maryland bridges and
Wellington Crescent. Riders coming from
downtown and heading south on Wellington
will cross on the Sherbrook side, to save
time and to eliminate three difficult road
crossings. The bridge sidewalk is wide
enough for cyclists to pass pedestrians, but
there is no safe connection to Wellington.
Cyclists should be prevented from turning
onto the sidewalk in front of the synagogue,
and instead, the street crossing should be
made safer.
 
A-  Unfortunately Wellington Crescent is not
one of the funded routes that is part of the
Infrastructure Stimulus Program and is not a
part of this particular project. We will pass
your comment onto Kevin Nixon, the City of
Winnipeg Active Transportation Coordinator
for future consideration.
 
Q - Because Fleet is a snow route, how does
the bike boulevard change our designation.
 
A- No change would occur to Fleet's
designation as a snow route.
 
Q -  Snow plowing is hard enough without
any bump outs or traffic circles
 
A -The City of Winnipeg Public Works
maintenance is kept fully aware of all
proposed changes on all active
transportation routes and the design of new
roadway features takes into consideration
snow clearing operations.
 
Q -  I think a number of suggestions you listed
on your card may all help in calming traffic,
with the exception of traffic circles. I have
lived in a number of cities in Canada and
have actually seen some of them removed
over the years. I wonder if there is something
to be learned in that before the city goes
ahead and potentially wastes some time and
money on that specific measure.
 
A- Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm
traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can
actually reduce the overall speed of the
roadway by 10%.  They can be used at
intersections that do not have existing stop
signs or at intersections with two-way or four-
way stops.  When implemented they reduce
conflict points and decrease collision rates
by up to 70%.  They have been used
successfully in the United Kingdom since the
mid 1970s and have caught on quite
dramatically in North America in the last ten
to fifteen years.  Their purpose along bike
corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity
and to also to calm and potentially reduce
traffic.
 

Categories: Alternative transportation

How are traffic circles safer for pedestrian crossing?

August, 2010 -  For instance lots of students walk across Waverley on their way to River Heights School.

Could you tell us how the traffic calming circles will improve safety for pedestrians?


At all intersections with traffic calming circles vehicles must yield to pedestrians crossing the road as laid out in the Manitoba Highway Traffic Act.

Traffic calming circles are designed to slow vehicle movements through intersections.    A vehicle can “roll” through an intersection controlled by a stop sign, however, a traffic calming circle creates a physical obstacle in the roadway to attract motorists’ attention and slow them down.  The combination of slower moving vehicles and more attentive drivers creates a safer pedestrian environment.

On Grosvenor the type of traffic calming circles constructed will not cause vehicles to encroach upon pedestrian movements. 
As well, by design the traffic calming circle will reduce pedestrian-vehicle conflict points.  Prior to the implementation of these circles the intersection of Waverley and Grosvenor had 24 pedestrian-vehicle conflict points, whereas it now has been reduced to 8 pedestrian-vehicle conflict points.
 
Sidebar re: Crash Reduction
There are two basic premises on which roundabouts achieve crash reductions of 50 to 90 percent when compared to two and four-way stop control and signalized intersections and greatly reduced severity on those few crashes that do occur.
One is the simple decision making combined with the low level of conflicts.
At a four-way intersection there are 32 possible conflict points between vehicles and only eight at roundabouts.
Pedestrians face six conflicts when crossing only one leg of the road whereas at a roundabout they only have two. (See figures attached to email.  Traffic Circle 1 shows a regular intersection.  Traffic Circle 2 shows an intersection with a traffic circle.)

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Public Safety, Traffic, Transit

What is the purpose of curb bump outs?

The purpose of curb bump outs is two-fold:

1) They create a shorter distance for pedestrians to cross, making people standing at an intersection more visible

2) They slow down vehicular traffic. The general principal is that the wider and more open a street, the faster the cars will travel down it.

The space between the bump-outs are wide enough for both the bicycle lanes and traffic lanes.
 
So although the lanes are wide enough to accomodate both bicyclists and traffic, they give the perception of narrower lanes, which should slow down traffic.
 
Additional information bump outs can be found at:
 
 
 

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Public Safety, Traffic

Why Place Curb Extensions on Fleet?

Curb extensions (or a widening of the boulevard), which narrow travel lanes, are a traffic calming technique used in residential areas.

Curb extensions improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists by:

-Reducing vehicle speeds

-Providing improved sight lines for cyclists by defining parking bays and preventing cars from parking too close to an intersection

-Reducing crossing distance for pedestrians

-Increasing pedestrian visibility

Curb extensions were designed on Fleet to be the same width as a parked car to allow for the above. 

Cyclists ride approximately 1 meter off of parked cars / the parking lane, thus no weaving is required in the presence of a curb extension.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Traffic

Why was I not aware of the Bike Boulevards?

It is unfortunate that the attempts made to engage the community prior to construction, including Canada Post mail out to all Ward residents north of the CNR tracks, hand delivered letters to houses four in from the Bike Boulevards, numerous community paper ads, emails and three open houses was not successful in engaging the community.

I was shocked that no notification was also provided to the neighbourhood warning them about the upcoming construction. That was not acceptable and I twas able to at least get a commitment to put up signage along the routes providing some basic information and contact information.

Please help me communicate with you by signing up (www.orlikow.ca) for Community Connections bulletins that will be sent to you when issues or news occurs in your neighbourhood.

Categories: Alternative transportation

Why use Grosvenor Ave as a Bike Boulevard?

The City of Winnipeg is developing an active transportation bike boulevard on Grosvenor which entails implementing traffic calming measures and bike lanes to slow down vehicles and create a safer environment for pedestrians and cyclists.

The width of the roadway is not being reduced, however with the addition of curb extensions at certain intersections the driver will perceive that the road is narrower.  The effect will be a speed reduction for vehicles and a shorter distance for pedestrians to cross the road.
 
On-street parking will be removed from the north side of a section of Grosvenor (west of Cambridge) as it is underutilized the majority of the time; the street is wide enough east of Cambridge to accommodate lanes for parking, vehicles and cyclists.
 
The addition of a traffic calming circles on Grosvenor will also decrease vehicle speeds on Grosvenor, which should increase pedestrian safety.  Traffic counts for this street indicate it is within the limit for fully functional traffic calming circles. Traffic calming circles, used at the proper frequency, can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%.
 
Grosvenor is an important east-west connection for cyclists due to its continuity and the controlled crossings at major intersections.  Adding bike lanes and traffic calming measures on to Grosvenor creates a safer cycling environment while still allowing full vehicle access to the street.

Categories: Alternative transportation

Why not use Kingsway instead of Grosvenor Ave.?

While Kingsway is also a good route, it does not have a facilitated crossing at Harrow and is discontinuous at Harrow.

Its connection as an AT route to Wellington Crescent is also made difficult due to its proximity to Academy and queuing traffic at the lights there. 

As well, part of the future plan for Grosvenor is to extend it westward to Lockwood across the old rail right-of-way by constructing a multi-use pathway.

Categories: Alternative transportation

Answers to Councillor Orlikow's Bike Boulevard Questions

Grosvenor – West Leg

Q:        How does the Boulevard connect to Kenaston and has Kenaston pedestrian over-pass been accounted for?
 
A:        The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard ends at Lockwood after crossing the former CN rail right-of-way by a 3.5 metre multi-use pathway. Via Lockwood, cyclists can cross Kenaston at the traffic signals at either Tuxedo or Lockston.
 
Tuxedo currently has a cyclist activated button to give cyclists a priority green light ahead of the traffic on Tuxedo on the west of Kenaston.
 
As part of the Route 90 widening project a bike path has been proposed for two-way cyclist travel on the west boulevard of Kenaston.
 
The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard via Tuxedo and Lockston would connect to this future bike path. In addition Tuxedo to the west of Kenaston is currently on the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation (AT) Network map as a future AT route that would connect to Grosvenor.
 
The pedestrian overpass proposed as part of the Route 90 widening project at Lockston then Grosvenor would link to this via Lockwood.
 
 
Q:        Has the parking for Westworth United church been addressed?
 
A:                    The parking lane along the north side of Grosvenor is under-utilized the majority of the time.  In order to provide for a safe bicycle corridor this space is required; it is recommended that parking be shifted to Beaverbrook and Lanark.   Alternatives for this current proposal is as follows:
 
·        End bike corridor at Lanark and revert to a shared roadway for cyclist traffic.
 
·        Look at constructing bump-ins to accommodate Church patrons and park users.  However, this would be a drastic measure as mature trees would have to be removed and property would have to be acquired.  As well, with the construction of bump-ins for parking, the sidewalk would have to be reconstructed further north.
 
Q:        Is it wise to remove four way stops?
 
A:                    Yes, The addition of a traffic calming circle on Grosvenor will decrease vehicle speeds on Grosvenor, which should increase pedestrian safety.
 
Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%.  They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops.  When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%.  They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years.  Their purpose along bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic.
 
Q:        Is there a concern about removing the four way stop at the Waverley and Grosvenor intersection due to high volume of traffic.
 
A:        No, The traffic count for this intersection does not exceed 1000 vehicles per hour therefore the intersection is within the limit for a fully functional traffic calming circle.
 
Q:        Is the street measurements accurate for the West Grosvenor?
 
A:        Yes the street width has been confirmed by survey and is wide enough for 2 bike lanes and 2 travel lanes (with parking removed).
 
Grosvenor – East Leg
 
Q:        Is road wide enough? (Cambridge to Stafford).
 
A:        The roadway is approximately 11 meters, a “road” diet is implemented which will enhance the traffic calming of the street with narrow lanes for both the cyclist as well as the vehicles. A parking lane will be provided in this section.
 
Q:        What options are available for a one lane bike boulevard from Lilac to Stafford? (The citizen proposal was:   link the Boulevard to Wellington down Dorchester St. from Wellington to Lilac then down Lilac to Grosvenor. Then remove parking on one side down to Stafford where it connects to the west leg)
 
A:        A one lane bike boulevard from Lilac to Stafford is not an option since parking is required on both sides of the street at Stafford and Grosvenor (for the businesses). There is a proposal to have permanent parking on Grosvenor (on both sides of Grosvenor from Stafford to Wellington) with curb extensions to calm traffic as well as have a wider travel lane for the vehicles and cyclists to share, this is still under investigation.           
 
 
Fleet – West Leg
 
Q:        Where does it connect to and can the $50 K from Active Transportation go to connect straight across and/or up old rail line to Juba park?
 
A:        As part of this project the Fleet / Warsaw Bike Boulevard will end at Centennial. The City of Winnipeg Active Transportation Network map shows a future connection from here to Route 90 that the City would like to pursue in the future. Route 90 is also proposed to have a future bike path alongside it as part of the widening project. Unfortunately this connection cannot occur as part of this project due to budget restrictions, project timelines and property issues.
 
Q:        Can a pedestrian bridge be build over the CPR tracks?
 
A:        No, the construction of a bridge over the CPR would not be feasible as there is not enough property at the end of John Brebeuf to accommodate the structures’ descent to street level (to be accessible for cyclists and pedestrians with disabilities). 
 
Q:        How will snow plows deal with raised crosswalks?
 
A:        The City of Winnipeg Public Works Maintenance is kept fully aware of all proposed changes on all active transportation routes. Every effort is made to ensure that any proposed changes to roadways such as traffic calming on bike boulevards would not impact snow clearing. The raised crosswalk would be very similar to speed humps that currently exist on several roads in the city.
 
Fleet – East Leg
 
Q:        There is a lot of traffic going through the Nathaniel and Fleet intersection. Is there any plans to deal with this intersection?
 
A:        Nathaniel and Fleet is a T-intersection with large trees in the boulevard, no treatment is proposed. The stop sign is for Nathaniel which allows the cyclists and pedestrians to get through the intersection safely on Fleet.
 
Q:        Is there parking allowed on Fleet and Warsaw?
 
A:        There is no plan to remove any parking on Fleet or Warsaw at this time.
 
Q:        How are cars and bikes going to be separated from each other and to allow for bikers to safely turn onto Thurso?
 
A:        The intersection of Fleet and Thurso is currently a four-way stop and this will not change. Bike and motor vehicle movements will remain the same with all users of the intersection taking their appropriate turn to travel straight through or to make a turn.
 
Q:        Is there going to be any help for people getting across Harrow?
 
A:        With the cross walk at Jessie and Harrow for the school as well as not enough boulevard width and mature trees, this crossing will not be aided.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Roads, Traffic

Will the Fleet Bike Boulevard extend to Brebouf?

On the original AT-ISP map John Brebeuf was not on the route, but we decided for connectivity we would propose to add a path to get across the tracks and simply place signage on John Brebeuf as a bike route.

 Therefore, the are no traffic calming measures, removal of parking or addressing the four way stops along this section at this time.
 

Categories: Alternative transportation, Roads

What is a traffic circle and how do they work?

Winnipeg will benefit from the installation of its first neighbourhood traffic circles as part of the on-road infrastructure being introduced under the Active Transportation Infrastructure Stimulus Program (ATISP).

Traffic circles have become an essential aspect of design and engineering for active neighbourhoods in North America.

They have been used to great success in manycities including Edmonton, Minneapolis, Vancouver and Montreal and are increasingly being implemented in smaller urbancentres and suburban areas.

For more information please click on the link below:

images/userfiles/Traffic Circles Outline.pdf

Categories: Alternative transportation, Roads, Traffic

Putting a multi-use path along the Renfrew Backlane

 In regards to putting a multi-use path along the Renfrew Backlane the consultant replied to the constituents question is:

-          There is not enough space (only about 3.5m between the tracks and the parking lot for Quizno’s/Mac’s Convenience Store) for a Multi-use path to go through from Corydon to John Brebeuf.  This wouldn’t provide any clear zone (required for safety) between the parking fence and the track bed.

-      Not enough lighting along the backlane to provide a safe location for multi-use path.

-      Many trees along the rail right of way (would have to be removed)

Categories: Alternative transportation

Does a person driving a car or bike go around the traffic circle if they were turning left?

To make a left turn at a traffic circle, you will travel around the centre island in a counter - clockwise direction.

The traffic circles will be signed with Chevron Alignment signs which will direct traffic to travel counter-clockwise around the centre island.

 

Categories: Alternative transportation

Consultant's answers to residents on the proposed Bike Boulevards

 The answers below are the consultants's responses to the questions and comments made by residents.

Please let me know if you have comments, suggestions or concerns. 

1.  Question:      Concern about removal of parking around the church on Grosvenor at Lanark
 
Answer:         The parking lane along the north side of Grosvenor is under-utilized the majority of the time.  In order to provide for a safe bicycle corridor this space is required; it is recommended that parking be shifted to Beaverbrook and Lanark.   Alternatives for this current proposal are as follows:
 
a)     End bike corridor at Lanark and revert to a shared roadway for cyclist traffic.
 
b)     Look at constructing bump-ins to accommodate Church patrons and park users.  However, this would be a drastic measure as mature trees would have to be removed and property would have to be acquired.  As well, with the construction of bump-ins for parking, the sidewalk would have to be reconstructed further north.

2.  Question:      Where does the bike path goes once it dead ends at Lockwood? 

 Answer:         The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard ends at Lockwood after crossing the former CN rail right-of-way by a 3.5 metre multi-use pathway. Via Lockwood, cyclists can cross Kenaston at the traffic signals at either Tuxedo or Lockston. Tuxedo currently has a cyclist activated button to give cyclists a priority green light ahead of the traffic on Tuxedo on the west of Kenaston. As part of the Route 90 widening project a bike path has been proposed for two-way cyclist travel on the west boulevard of Kenaston. The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard via Tuxedo and Lockston would connect to this future bike path. In addition Tuxedo to the west of Kenaston is currently on the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation (AT) Network map as a future AT route that would connect to Grosvenor.
 
3.  Comment:     For Fleet, Warsaw, Nassau to be a good route, say from CMU, it needs to have a foot path across the Rail Road track.  It has slow RR traffic.
 
Answer:         Unfortunately a footpath crossing of the CPR rail lines between Renfrew and Lindsay, while a good idea was not possible for many reasons. These reasons include budget, property issues and project timelines. We have recognized that that the east-west connections across the rail lines are important and have proposed multi-use pathways along the rail right-of-way on Lindsay St to Corydon Ave and on Corydon Ave across the tracks to Renfrew. By using these pathways cyclists and pedestrians will be able to connect from Fleet to John Brebeuf Pl.
 
4.  Question:      Some streets in R. Heights could have parking on the opposite side, i.e. some on East, some on West.  This allows bikers to choose streets where they are not likely to run into an opening car door.
 
Answer:         Due to the funding arrangement and timing deadlines we are not able to conduct a wider parking study on all streets within River Heights. We will pass your comment onto Kevin Nixon, the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation Coordinator for future consideration.  
 
5.  Question:      Cycling N & S. in our area could be facilitated along the former RR track if narrow cross walks were built on the boulevards of Grant and Corydon.  We like to go this route to Wellington and Assiniboine Park and is now even more feasible with nice black top along the new condos.
 
Answer:         Unfortunately due to property ownership issues these routes cannot be pursued at this time.
 
6.  Comment:     My only concern is that the area to the south-east of Pembina is cut off from this route. I don't know if there are plans to put in a pedestrian bridge or tunnel to go across.
 
Answer:         The city is currently looking at solutions to the Pembina underpass issue. While it is not a part of this project, it is something that the city will be looking at in the future.
 
7.  Comment:     Going through our neighbourhood, I much prefer Dorchester to Grosvenor; Lilac to Stafford or Harrow. Removal of some of the east-west stop signs would make Dorchester much more useable.
 
Answer:         As there are limited amounts of funding and the corridors have already been chosen, removal of stop signs and required mitigation through traffic calming along Dorchester is not within the scope of works for the current project.
 
8.  Comment:     Grosvenor Avenue between Stafford and Wellington can be quite congested. Traffic lines up for the light; there is continuous parking; the street is not that wide. We always avoid Grosvenor, taking the alley or Dorchester. I cannot see adding bicycle lanes without eliminating parking, which would be a nuisance as the neighbourhood is quite densely populated.
 
Answer:         Currently there are no bicycle lanes proposed on Grosvenor between Stafford and Wellington for the reasons that you mentioned and we agree that removing parking on that particular stretch is not a feasible option. 
 
9.  Suggestion: I would very much like to see standard signage alerting motorists that bicycles will be crossing or entering a major street. 

Answer:         This is something that we can consider as part of our signage strategy for the project. 

 

 
10.  Comment:    We need to make sure that there are no gaps. One of these is the connection between the Maryland bridges and Wellington Crescent. Riders coming from downtown and heading south on Wellington will cross on the Sherbrook side, to save time and to eliminate three difficult road crossings. The bridge sidewalk is wide enough for cyclists to pass pedestrians, but there is no safe connection to Wellington. Cyclists should be prevented from turning onto the sidewalk in front of the synagogue, and instead, the street crossing should be made safer.
 
Answer:         Unfortunately Wellington Crescent is not one of the funded routes that is part of the Infrastructure Stimulus Program and is not a part of this particular project. We will pass your comment onto Kevin Nixon, the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation Coordinator for future consideration.
 
11.  Question:     Because Fleet is a snow route, how does the bike boulevard change our designation?
 
Answer:         No change would occur to Fleet's designation as a snow route.
 
12.  Question:     Snow plowing is hard enough without any bump outs
 
Answer:         The City of Winnipeg Public Works Maintenance is kept fully aware of all proposed changes on all active transportation routes and the design of new roadway features takes into consideration snow clearing operations.
 
13.  Question:     Permanent "bike route signage" similar to the green signs on Balmoral and Wellington
 
Answer:         The final design of the bike route signage has not been determined yet.
 
14.  Comment:    I think a number of suggestions you listed on your card may all help in calming traffic, with the exception of traffic circles. I have lived in a number of cities in Canada and have actually seen some of them removed over the years. I wonder if there is something to be learned in that before the city goes ahead and potentially wastes some time and money on that specific measure.
 
Answer:         Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%.  They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops.  When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%.  They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years.  Their purpose along bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic.
 
15.  Question:     Are curb bump outs on Cambridge appropriate?
 
Answer:          There are limited amounts of funding and the corridors have already been chosen, traffic calming measures implemented along Cambridge is not within the scope of works for the current project. Cambridge is identified on the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation Network as a future route, so curb bump outs or other traffic calming measures may be considered in the future as part of a new project.
 
 
16.  Question:     Is the intersection of Waverly and Grosvenor appropriate for a traffic circle?
 
Answer:          The effect of installing a traffic circle at the intersection of Waverley and Grosvenor would have on Cambridge then I can safely say that it is anticipated that there will not be an impact.  Traffic Calming Circles are primarily used to calm traffic rather than divert it elsewhere.  In other words, traffic should remain on Waverley and Grosvenor.  As an Active Transportation route it is anticipated that Grosvenor will become calmer and thus more successfully accommodate cyclists.
 
17.  Question:     Where was the consultation with the community?
 
Answer:         The information gathered at the January Working Session on the Fort Rouge / River Heights Bikeway system was used to develop the information presented at the February 24 Open House. The presentation materials from February 24 are on the City of Winnipeg website. 
 
18.  Question:     Will traffic calming be achieved by adding traffic circles?
 
Answer:         Based upon Canadian engineering publications and sound engineering judgment we feel that the traffic calming circles are appropriate along this corridor.
 
a.      Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%.  They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops.  When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%.  They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years.  Their purpose along this bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic.  The traffic calming circles will be signed and marked appropriately so they are not dangerous to the travelling public. [I would like to know where and why the traffic calming circles are inappropriately placed.
 
b.      As far as lane widths go, this is up to the discretion of the City of Winnipeg.[I would like the gentlemen to specify exactly where the lane widths or parking lane widths are less than desirable. ]
 
19.  Question:     Will there be an opportunity to attend an open house to discuss in more detail?
 
Answer:         The Nassau Street information session will be held on Thursday April 8, 2010 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM at Crescent Fort Rouge United Church, 525 Wardlaw Avenue.
 
20.  Question:     Why is the process so rushed?
 
Answer:         The process is very rushed as we are reacting to the Federal Government’s time lines associated with the funding for this particular project.  However the City of Winnipeg Council approved the active transportation program and have allocated resources to AT initiatives each year for the past 4 years in order to build its AT network.
 
21. Question:              A resident inquired about the safety of adding of a traffic circle at Brock & Grosvenor, being the entry point to the park, is very busy with people with dogs, babies and small children.
 
 
Answer:       Based upon Canadian engineering publications and sound engineering judgment we feel that the traffic calming circles are appropriate along this corridor.
 
Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic. Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%. They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops.
 
When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%. They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years.
 
Their purpose along this bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic. The traffic calming circles will be signed and marked appropriately so they are not dangerous to the public.
 
Currently there is not a four-way stop at the intersection in question.
 
There is a two-way stop for traffic on Brock Street while Grosvenor is free-flow. The addition of a traffic calming circle on Grosvenor will decrease vehicle speeds on Grosvenor, which should increase pedestrian safety.
 

22.    Question:    What signs will replace the removal of stop signs where traffic circles are going?

Answer:     There will be yield signs at the traffic circles as the control device.

The traffic circles will also have plantings on them that will enhance the area.

 

Categories: Alternative transportation

Why is there no public skating on retention ponds?

A resident inquired as to having an ice trail on retention ponds.

Due to the uncertain ice conditions and the lack of resources the City is unwilling to insure or provide resources operating budget.

It is a wonderful idea and a great way to connect a neighbourhood.  I will continue to see if there are opportunities in the future.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Sustainability